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University of Bedfordshire
University Square
Luton
Bedfordshire
UK, LU1 3JU

Prof Gail Kinman

Professor of Occupational Health Psychology

Gail Kinman

I am a Chartered Psychologist and an Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society, and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. I am Director of the Research Centre for Applied Psychology here at the University of Bedfordshire.

My research interests are in the area occupational health psychology. I have a long-standing interest in the psychosocial working conditions of those who do emotionally demanding and knowledge intensive work and how the implications for their wellbeing, work-life balance and job performance. Another key interest is the ways in which working conditions influence sickness behaviours such as presenteeism. I have conducted research in these areas with various occupational groups, with a particular focus on 'helping' professionals such as health and social care professionals, prison officers and fire and rescue personnel, members of the clergy, and knowledge intensive workers such as academics.

I am currently working with health and social care professionals to investigate the organisation and individual factors that underpin emotional resilience in trainee and experienced staff. With Dr. Louise Grant from Frontline, I am developing a competency framework to help line managers build resilience and protect the wellbeing of social care staff. The impact of electronic communication technology on the management of boundaries between work and personal life is another key interest and, together with the Switched-on Culture Research Group (see alwaysonculture.wordpress.com), I am working on various projects to help individuals and organisations develop ‘e-resilience’ in order to manage technology in a healthy and sustainable way.  Other recent research has investigated the causes, consequences and experience of specific emotional experiences at work, such as crying, compassion fatigue, and the ways in which couples who do similar work manage the work-home interface.

My research has been published widely in peer-reviewed journals, reports and practice focused publications. I regularly present at national and international conferences and my research has been extensively featured in the media. I co-chair the British Psychological Society (BPS) Working Group for Work-life Balance which communicates evidence-based research and practice to organisations, employees and other academics. I am also a member of the Editorial Board of The Psychologist (the monthly publication of the British Psychological Society).

Qualifications

  • PhD Awarded 2006 University of Hertfordshire. “Occupational stress and work-life balance in UK academics”. 

Teaching Role

My teaching interests relate to occupational health psychology as well as health and occupational psychology more generally. I also develop and deliver CPD training courses in areas such as enhancing resilience in health and social care practitioners, stress management for managers and employees, improving work-life balance and working effectively in teams.

Research Interests

  • The implications of working in emotionally demanding jobs, such as health and social care and safety-critical work
  • Work-related wellbeing in further and higher education in the UK
  • Multi-level approaches to building resilience
  • Reducing attrition in student and recently qualified nurses
  • Emotional experiences at work: e.g. emotional labour, interpersonal conflict and crying
  • Empathy and compassion
  • Work-life conflict, facilitation and enrichment and the implications of flexible working
  • The use of technology, work-related stress and work-life balance
  • Presenteeism
  • Stress and health
  • Cancer survivors’ experiences of work
  • Lay understandings of health and disease

Recent Research Projects

  • Enhancing resilience in health and social care employees
  • Emotional literacy, empathy and compassion in 'helping' professionals
  • Work-related wellbeing and work-life balance in academic employees
  • Work and wellbeing in prison officers
  • Identifying the factors underpinning retention and psychological distress in health and social care trainees
  • Work-life balance and recovery strategies in the police and fire service
  • The role of perfectionism in recovery from work
  • Experiences of the work-home interface for couples doing similar work
  • Emotional demands and wellbeing in teachers
  • Women crying at work

Service to the Academic/Professional Community

  • Director of the Research Centre for Applied Psychology, University of Bedfordshire
  • Executive Committee member of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology
  • Associate Editor for interviews for The Psychologist and member of the BPS Policy and Practice Committee;
  • Co-founder and co-chair of the BPS Working Group on Work-Life Balance;
  • Member of BPS Specialist Knowledge Group in the field of Occupational Health Psychology;
  • Associate Editor for the International Journal of Stress Management
  • Commissioning Editor for the British Medical Bulletin
  • Member of the editorial board for Cogent Psychology;
  • Book editor for the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology journal
  • Invited member of the international award committee for the Kanter Award for Excellence in Work-Family Research (2009 to date).
  • Expert assessor for the British Medical Association Foundation for Medical Research Awards
  • Reviewer for several international research councils (such and high impact journals

Examples of public lectures and invited talks

  • Keynote speaker. The quality of academic life – what facilitates and challenges wellbeing and collegiality? Symposium on Higher Education: Learning Communities, Collaboration and Collegiality. National University of Ireland, Galway
  • Invited speaker. Work and wellbeing in correctional officers. Strategic Detention Seminar, Defence School of Policing and Guarding, Portsmouth
  • Invited speaker. Care and compassion in healthcare. Medical Education Seminar, Luton and Dunstable University Hospital, Luton
  • Invited speaker. Flexible working and work-life balance, Impact Hub, London
  • Public lecture. The science of stress. The Physiological Society, London.
  • Invited speaker. Resilience and teacher wellbeing. Teach 2017 Conference, London
  • Invited speaker. Emotional intelligence and resilient organisations. Occupational Health Legal and Professional Update, At Work Partnership, London
  • Keynote speaker. Work-life balance, wellbeing and technology use in UK academics, Digital Scholars in a Mobile World: Symposium exploring work-life balance in academic life. Hull.
  • Keynote speaker. Work-life Balance, The British Psychological Society’s London and Home Counties Branch, Hertfordshire
  • Keynote speaker. Building emotional resilience in helping professionals. Schwartz Community Conference, London
  • Keynote speaker. International Psychology Conference, Dubai
  • Keynote speaker. British Psychological Society’s Annual Conference, Nottingham
  • Invited speaker. Workplace flexibility, work-life balance and wellbeing. Health and Wellbeing at Work Conference, Birmingham
  • Invited speaker. Work and wellbeing in the prison service.  Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, London
  • Invited speaker. Work-related well-being in academic employees. University of Oxford
  • Keynote speaker. Stress Network Conference, Birmingham, 2015
  • Keynote speaker. Building Resilience in Social Care. Community Care Live, Birmingham
  • Invited speaker. Work-related stress among prison officers. The EU Commission, Luxemburg
  • Invited seminar. ’Work-related wellbeing in the prison service’ House of Commons

Examples of workshops, seminars and conferences organised

  • Developing a resilient workforce – how can team managers support emotional resilience and wellbeing in social workers. Research in Practice Workshop, London.
  • Building an emotional curriculum for health and social care: an evidence informed approach. Development of an emotional curriculum for pre-registration students workshop. Health Education England
  • What do we know about emotional resilience in social workers and social care workers? Social Care Conference 2016, Oxford
  • Work-life Balance? What about Fathers? Seminar for National Work-life Week, British Psychological Society, London
  • A transdisciplinary approach to building e-resilience: managing technology, the Balance Network, London
  • Work-life Balance – an evidence based approach for practitioners, BPS Learning a Living Seminars, London
  • Work-life balance and wellbeing in recession and austerity. ESRC Seminar Series: Work-life Balance in the Recession and Beyond, London
  • The impact of technology across the lifespan. BPS Seminar Series on the ‘always on’ culture across the lifespan. Birkbeck, London

Recent Conference Presentations

  • Grant, C. & Kinman, G. (2017) E-worker resilience: A competency-based approach to ameliorate the impact of technology on wellbeing. European Work and Organisational Psychology Conference, Dublin
  • Kinman, G. (2017) EAOHP Discussion panel on insights from Occupational Health Psychology – What works? Proceedings of the BPS Occupational Psychology Conference, Liverpool, p. 225-230
  • Kinman, G. & McDowall, A. (2017) The new nowhere land. Who is responsible for our ‘always on’ culture? Proceedings of the BPS Occupational Psychology Conference, Liverpool, p. 259-272
  • Grant, C. & Kinman, G. What makes a resilient e-worker? A competency approach supporting wellbeing. Proceedings of the BPS Occupational Psychology Conference, Liverpool, 238-240
  • Kinman, G. & Grant, L. (2017) Building emotional resilience in the children and families social care workforce, Proceedings of the BPS Occupational Psychology Conference, Liverpool, p. 42-43
  • Wray, S. & Kinman, G. (2017) Beyond workload: Illegitimate tasks and academic wellbeing Proceedings of the BPS Occupational Psychology Conference, Liverpool, 242-244
  • Kinman, G., Clements, A. & Hart, J. (2016). Job demands and work-life conflict in UK prison officers. European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference, Athens
  • Kinman, G. & Wray, S. (2016). Predicting presenteeism in academic employees: risk and protective factors. European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference, Athens
  • Kinman, G., Grant, L. & Baker, S.  (2016). Caring for oneself as well as others: compassion, wellbeing and distress in female social workers. European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference, Athens
  • Kinman, G., McDowall, A. & Wray, S. (2017) Workplace flexibility and work-life balance: friend or foe? Professional Forum, Proceedings of the BPS Occupational Psychology Conference, Nottingham
  • Kinman, G. (2016). Enabled intensification? ICT use, work-life balance and wellbeing in UK academics. Proceedings of the BPS Occupational Psychology Conference, Nottingham
  • Kinman, G., Clements, A. & Hart, J. (2016) Struggling on regardless: Presenteeism in UK prison officers. Proceedings of the BPS Division of Occupational Psychology Conference, Nottingham, 141-145
  • Kinman, G. (2016). Work-life balance and sustainable working life.  Invited symposium on emerging challenges and priority areas in occupational health psychology: Future directions in research, policy and practice. Proceedings of the BPS Occupational Psychology Conference, Nottingham,
  • Kinman, G. & Grant, L. (2015). Building resilience in social care professionals. European Conference for Social Work Research, Ljubljana, April
  • McDowall, A. & Kinman, G. (2016). Has HR no role to play in managing the digital present and future of work? CIPD Applied Research Conference, University of Westminster, December
  • Golding, D., Kinman, G. & Kozub, S. (2016). Journeys to wellbeing: Stress, coping and expeditions. BPS Annual Conference, Nottingham, April
  • Kinman, G. & Wray, S. (2016). In sickness and in health: Presenteeism in academic employees in the UK. Institute of Work Psychology International Conference, Sheffield, April
  • Kinman, G. & McDowall, A. (2016). Always on? Technology use, recovery and work-life balance. Symposium at the Institute of Work Psychology International Conference, Sheffield, April
  • Kinman, G. (2016). “Pushing water uphill with a rake”: E-mail use, boundary management and work-life balance in academics. Institute of Work Psychology International Conference, Sheffield, April
  • Wray, S. & Kinman, G. (2016) “Not part of my job”: Perceptions of role, task legitimacy and burnout in academic employees. Institute of Work Psychology International Conference, Sheffield, April
  • Kinman, G. (2016). Wellbeing and work-life balance in the emergency and security services. Symposium at the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference, Athens, April
  • Payne, N., Kinman, G. & Hughes, E. (2016) Job demands and resources, recovery strategies and work-life outcomes in UK fire and rescue service operational staff. European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference, Athens, April
  • Kinman, G., Grant, L. & Baker, S. (2016). Compassion, wellbeing and distress in female social workers: caring for the self. Invited symposium sponsored by the BPS DOP European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference, Athens, April
  • Kinman, G., Clements, A. & Hart, J. (2016). Job demands and work-life conflict in UK prison officers. European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference, Athens, April
  • Kinman, G. & Karanika-Murray, M. (2016). Presenteeism: moving the field forward. Symposium at the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference, Athens, April
  • Kinman, G. & Wray, S. (2016). Predicting presenteeism in academic employees: risk and protective factors. European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference, Athens, April
  • Kinman, G., Clements, A. & Hart, J. (2016). Presenteeism in UK prison officers: a qualitative analysis. European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference, Athens, April
  • Kinman, G. (2016). Enabled intensification: email, work-life balance and wellbeing in UK academics. Symposium at the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference, Athens, April
  • Hardacre, S. & Kinman, G. (2016).Managing emotional demands in healthcare assistants: The role of trait mindfulness. European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology Conference, Athens, April

Recent Publications

Books and book chapters

  • Kinman, G. & Wray, S. (forthcoming, 2018). Work and wellbeing in academic employees: an evidence based approach. Palgrave
  • Kinman, G. & McDowall, A. (2016). Work life balance, health and wellbeing in a time of austerity. In S. Lewis and N. Payne (Eds.) Work-life Balance in the Recession and Beyond. Routledge
  • Kinman, G. (2016) Managing the work-home interface; the experience of women academics. In R. Gervais and P. Millear (Eds). Resourceful Women.
  • Kinman, G. & Grant, L. (2016). Enhancing accurate empathy in the helping professions. In D. Watt & J. Panksepp (Eds). The Psychology of Empathy. Nova Science.
  • Clements, A., Kinman, G. & Hart, J. (2015). Using the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) benchmark framework to investigate wellbeing in the prison service: a mixed methods approach. Sage Research Methods Cases. Sage.
  • Grant, L. & Kinman, G. (2014). Developing Resilience for Social Work Practice. Palgrave
  • Payne, N., Kinman, G & Jones, F. (2012). Work stress and health behaviour: evidence and potential mechanisms, In J. Houdmont & S. Leka (Eds). Contemporary Occupational Health Psychology (vol. 2): Global Perspectives on Research and Practice. Wiley Blackwell

Examples of recent journal articles

  • Kinman G & Wray, K. (accepted) Presenteeism in academic employees – occupational and individual factors. Occupational Medicine.
  • McDowall, A. & Kinman, G. (in press) The New Nowhere Land? A research and practice agenda for the “Always on Culture" The Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance
  • Kinman, G., Clements, A. & Hart, J. (2017). Job demands, resources and mental health in UK prison officers. Occupational Medicine doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqx091
  • Miraglia, M. & Kinman, G. (2017). The hidden costs of working when sick, The Psychologist, 30, 36-41  thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-30/august-2017/hidden-costs-working-when-sick
  • Kinman, G. & Leggetter, G. (2017). The cost of kindness? Emotional labour, empathy and wellbeing in nursing. Healthcare. Special edition: Occupational Health Issues in the New Millennium. 4(4), 89   www.mdpi.com/2227-9032/4/4/89
  • Kinman, G., Clements, A. & Hart, J. (2017) Work-life balance and wellbeing in UK prison officers: the role of recovery experiences. Criminal Justice and Behaviour, 44. 2. 226-239 https://doi.org/10.1177/0093854816664923
  • Clements, A. & Kinman, G. (2017). Silence is golden: using safe words to promote research student ownership in supervisory meetings. Journal of Pedagogic Development 7, 1, 3-7 http://uobrep.openrepository.com/uobrep/handle/10547/622065
  • Kaviani, H. & Kinman, G. (2017). Relationships between psychosocial characteristics and democratic values in Iranians: a cross cultural study. Research and Reviews: Journal of Social Sciences, 3, 1, 12-22 https://doi.org/10.4172/2167-0358.1000206
  • Kinman, G. & Grant, L. (2016) Building resilience in early-career social workers: evaluating a multi-modal intervention. British Journal of Social Work https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcw164
  • Kinman, G. (2016) Effort-reward imbalance and over-commitment in UK academics: Implications for health, satisfaction and retention. Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 38, 5. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1360080X.2016.1181884
  • Kinman, G., Clements, A. & Hart, J. (2016) Work-related wellbeing in UK prison officers: A benchmarking approach. International Journal of Workplace Health Management, 9, 3, 290-307   https://doi.org/10.1108/IJWHM-09-2015-0054
  • Kinman, G. (2014). Doing more with less? Work and wellbeing in academics. Somatechnics, 4, 2, 219-235. https://doi.org/10.3366/soma.2014.0129
  • Hogan, C., Hogan, M., Hodgins, M. Kinman, G. & Bunting, B. (2015). An examination of gender differences in the impact of individual and organizational factors on work hours, work-life conflict, and psychological strain in academics. Irish Journal of Psychology 35 (2-3), 133-150, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03033910.2015.1011193
  • Grant, L. & Kinman, G. (2014) Put on your own oxygen mask before assisting others. British Journal of Social Work, 45, 8, 2351-2367  https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcu066
  • Grant, L., Kinman, G. & Alexander, K. (2014). What’s all this talk about emotion? Developing emotional intelligence in social work students. Social Work Education. 33, 7, 874–889, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02615479.2014.891012
  • Grant, L. & Kinman, G. (2013). “Bouncing Back?”: Personal representations of resilience in trainee and experienced social workers.  Practice, 25, 5, 349 – 366  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09503153.2013.860092
  • Flaxman, P., Menard, J., Bond, F. & Kinman, G. (2012). Academics’ Experiences of the Easter Break: Influence of Self-Critical Perfectionism and Perseverative Cognition on Respite Effect. Journal of Applied Psychology.97, 854- 65.   http://psycnet.apa.org/doi/10.1037/a0028055
  • Kinman, G., Rodriguez, J. & McFall, O.  (2011). The cost of caring? Emotional labour, wellbeing and the clergy. Pastoral Psychology,60, 5, 671-680
  • Kinman, G., Wray, S. & Strange, C. (2011) Emotional labour, burnout and job satisfaction in UK teachers: the role of workplace social support, Educational Psychology, 31, 7, 843-856 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2011.608650
  • Kinman, G. & Grant, L. (2011) Predicting stress resilience in trainee social workers: the role of emotional competencies. British Journal of Social Work,41, 2, 261-275  https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcq088

Published research reports and briefings

  • Kinman, G., Clements, A., Hart, J. & Wray, S. (2017). Why we can’t help working when ill. HRZone. www.hrzone.com/resources/presenteeism-explained-why-we-just-cant-help-working-when-ill
  • Grant, C., Kinman, G., McDowall, A., Quinones-Garcia, C. & Schlachter, S. (2016). E-resilience conference: A trans-disciplinary approach to building e-resilience. Balance Network Post-event Report
  • Kinman, G. & Grant, L. (2016). Building emotional resilience in the children and families workforce – an evidence-based approach. Research Informed Practice. RiP  www.rip.org.uk/resources/publications/strategic-briefings/building-emotional-resilience-in-the-children-and-families-workforce--an-evidenceinformed-approach-strategic-briefing-2016
  • Kinman, G. & Wray, S.(2015). Taking its Toll: Rising Stress Levels in Further Education. University College Union Stress Survey, UCU Publications.  https://www.ucu.org.uk/media/7265/UCU-FE-stress-survey-2014---report/pdf/ucu_festressreport14.pdf
  • Kinman, G., Clements, A. & Hart, J. (2014). Work-related Wellbeing in the Prison Service. POA Publications.
  • Kinman, G. & McDowall, A. (2014). Work-life Balance: Improving Employee Wellbeing. Corporate Wellbeing: Academic Insight Report. HRZone
  • Grant, L. & Kinman, G. (2014). The Importance of Emotional Resilience for Staff and Students in the “Helping” Professions. Higher Education Academy Research Briefing.  www.heacademy.ac.uk/resources/detail/resources/detail/disciplines/hsc/Social-Work-and-Social-Policy/Emotional
  • Kinman, G. & McDowall, A. (2014). Work-life Balance: Improving Employee Wellbeing. Corporate Wellbeing: Academic Insight Report. HRZone
  • Grant, L., Kinman, G. & Baker, S.  (2013). Developing an Emotional Curriculum for Social Workers: Perceptions of Lecturers.  Higher Education Academy Research Report. https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/system/files/developing_emotional_curriculum_grant_oct_2013_0.pdf
  • Kinman, G. & Wray, S. (2013). Higher Stress: A Survey of Stress and Wellbeing among Staff in Higher Education, London: UCU Publications. https://www.ucu.org.uk/media/5911/Higher-stress-a-survey-of-stress-and-well-being-among-staff-in-higher-education-Jul-13/pdf/HE_stress_report_July_2013.pdf
  • Payne, N. & Kinman, G. (2013). Work-related wellbeing in UK Fire and Rescue Services (reports for several services such as Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Durham and Oxfordshire)
  • Grant, L. & Kinman, L. (2012) Community Care Inform – resource guide to emotional resilience in social work http://www.communitycare.co.uk/blogs/social-work-blog/2012/08/social-work-is-an-undeniably.html
  • Kinman, G., Wray, S. & Court, S. (2012) Tackling Stress in Higher, Further, Adult and Prison Education. London: UCU Publications

Other recent articles

  • Kinman, G. & McDowall, A. (in press). The present and future of flexible and agile work. The changing workplace – special feature. The Psychologist
  • Kinman, G. (in press). Compassion – good for whom? HRZone
  • Kinman, G. & Teoh, K. (in press) Interview with Christina Maslach, The Psychologist
  • Kinman, G. (2017). Holding back the tide – extending working lives in the NHS. The Psychologist. thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/holding-back-tide-extending-working-lives-nhs
  • Kinman, G. (2017). Living well with dementia – Interview with Linda Clare, The Psychologist, 30, 66-69  https://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-30/july-2017/living-well-dementia-has-become-key-focus-policy
  • Kinman, G. (2017) Does change fatigue risk academic burnout? Times Higher Education. June 8,  https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/career-advice-does-change-fatigue-risk-academic-burnout
  • Wray, S. & Kinman, G. (2017). ‘That’s not what I signed up for!’ Linking job role, illegitimate tasks and wellbeing. HRZone www.hrzone.com/engage/employees/thats-not-what-i-signed-up-for-linking-job-role-illegitimate-tasks-and-wellbeing
  • Kinman, G. (2017) Presenteeism is hurting higher education. Times Higher Education March 23, https://www.timeshighereducation.com/blog/career-advice-presenteeism-is-hurting-higher-education
  • Teoh, K. & Kinman, G. (2017). Insights from Occupational Health Psychology – what works? OP Matters, 33, 23 - 25
  • Kinman, G. (2017) Presenteeism in academics: a shift to the twilight zone. HRZone. http://www.hrzone.com/lead/culture/presenteeism-in-academics-a-shift-to-the-twilight-zone
  • Kinman, G. (2016). How to switch off from a stressful working day. Times Educational Supplement www.tes.com/news/school-news/breaking-views/how-switch-a-stressful-work-day
  • Kinman, G. (2016). Seven tips to make peer coaching effective. https://www.tes.com/news/school-news/breaking-views/seven-tips-make-peer-coaching-effective
  • Grant, C., Kinman, G., Quinones, C. & Scholachter, S. (2016). A transdisciplinary approach to building e-resilience: managing technology. OP Matters, 31, 3-6
  • Kinman, G. & McDowall, A. (2016). Developing e-resilience. The Psychologist https://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/developing-e-resilience
  • McDowall, A. & Kinman, G. (2016). E-resilience – why should HR care? HRZone, https://www.hrzone.com/lead/future/e-resilience-why-should-hr-care
  • Gervais, R., Kinman, G. & McDowall, A. (2016). EAOHP 2016: Psychology in changing times. OP Matters, 30, 20-23
  • Kinman, G. (2016). In Rhodes, E. BPS Guide to Leadershipthepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-29/june/guide-toleadership
  • Clements, A., Leggetter, S. & Kinman, G. (2016). Returning to nursing. Nursing in Practice, 89. www.nursinginpractice.com/article/returning-nursing
  • Kinman, G. (2016). Tears were and still are crucial for our functioning. Interview with Ad Vingerhoets. The Psychologist, 29, 3, 200-202  https://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-29/march-2016/tears-were-and-still-are-crucial-our-functioning
  • Kinman, G., McDowall, A., Grant, C. & Schlachter, S. (2016). Information communication technology and work-life balance: Flexible friend or digital leash?  OP Matters 29, 41-43
  • Kinman, G. & McDowall, A. (2015) Work-life balance? What about fathers? OP Matters 28, 23-26
  • Clements, A., Leggetter, S. & Kinman, G. (2015). Inspiring commitment in nurses. Nursing in Practice, 87http://www.nursinginpractice.com/issues/36596
  • Kinman, G. Interview with Evangelia Demerouti. The Occupational Health Psychologist. 12, 1 http://www.eaohp.org/uploads/1/1/0/2/11022736/eaohp_newsletter_aug_2015.pdf
  • Kinman, G., McDowall, A., Grant, C. & Quinones-Garcia, C. (2015). The ‘always-on’ culture. Implications for work-life boundary management over the lifespan. OP Matters, 27, 30-32
  • Kinman, G. (2015). Be brave, psychology needs you. Interview with Cary Cooper. The Psychologist, 28, 904-905 https://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-28/november-2015/be-brave-psychology-needs-you
  • Kinman, G. & Grant, L. (2015). How do good social work managers promote staff wellbeing?  Community Care Resource, Community Care www.communitycare.co.uk/2015/06/24/good-social-work-managers-promote-staffs-wellbeing
  • Kinman, G., McDowall, A., Grant, C. & Quinones-Garcia, C. (2015). The ‘always-on’ culture. The Psychologist, 28, 7, p. 877
  • Kinman, G. (2015). Towards gross national wellbeing. The Psychologist online thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/towards-gross-national-wellbeing. May, 2015
  • Kinman, G. (2015). Close up and interpersonal: An interview with Anna on close relationships, fatherhood and more. The Psychologist, 28, 6, 472-473 https://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-28/june-2015/close-and-interpersonal
  • Kinman, G. & Clements, A. (2015). Work-related wellbeing in the prison service: a national study. The Custodial Review, Edition 73 https://issuu.com/review-magazines/docs/cr73_for_web/17
  • Cowan, S. & Kinman, G. (2015). Interview with Robert Karasek and Johannes Siegrist. The Occupational Health Psychologist, 11, 1, 6-10
  • McDowall, A., Kinman, G. & Grant, C. (2015) A Workshop on developing work-life balance competence: the importance of context. OP Matters, 26, 19-23
  • Kinman, G. (2014). The Accidental Academic: An interview with Peter Lovatt, University of Hertfordshire, on the psychology of dance. The Psychologist, 27, 5, 46 – 348  https://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-27/edition-5/interview-accidental-academic
  • Kinman, G. & McDowall, A. (2014). Striking a Balance: Interview with Professor Ellen Kossek, University of Michigan on work-life balance, The Psychologist, 27, 7, 520 – 521 thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/volume-27/edition-7/interview-striking-balance
  • Cowan, S. & Kinman, G. (2014) Interview with Robert Karasek and Johannes Siegrist. The Occupational Health Psychologist. 11, 1, http://www.eaohp.org/uploads/1/1/0/2/11022736/eaohp_newsletter_vol_11_issue_1.pdf
  • Kinman, G. (2014). Healthy disclosure; Interview with Professor Daryl O’Connor, University of Leeds on individual differences and stress. The Psychologist, 27, 7,  40-41 https://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/search/site/kinman%20interview%20daryl

Contact Details

Office: B215 Luton Campus
University Square
Luton, LU1 3JU

T: +44 (0)1582 489350
E: gail.kinman@beds.ac.uk
Twitter: ProfGailK

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