Select your course options:

Summary:

Applying via UCAS ?
Course Code: Q355

Applying via UCAS ?
Course Code: Q35Y

Where Are You Applying From?

How Would You Like To Study?

When Do You Want To Start Your Studies?

Which Campus Would You Like To Study At?

Which Options Would You Like With Your Course?

Why choose the School of Education


Ofsted – we are a ‘Good’ provider with Outstanding in Quality of leadership and management across our partnerships.

95% of our Education and Teaching graduates are in employment or further studies 15 months after graduating (HESA Graduate Outcomes, 2023)

Over 90% of students across all courses are employed within the first six months of graduation

100% of our undergraduate Primary Education graduates have secured jobs by the end of their course

Our Early Childhood Education course ranks 8th in its subject table for graduate prospects on track (Complete University Guide, 2024)

All teaching-training staff have QTS and were previously employed as teachers and/or head teachers; we also have teaching staff who are school governors or active members of their national subject associations

About the course

Explore English language, linguistics, and literature on a flexible course that allows you to follow your own interests in the field. There is also the option to study for the TEFLi, opening up a career teaching English in language schools across the UK and worldwide.

This degree will interest students who are fascinated by English, from discovering key linguistic frameworks to exploring exciting forms of literature and experimenting with creative writing. It is also flexible allowing you to design a course that best fits your strengths learning style and particular area of interest choosing from a wide range of units and four specific pathways: TESOL; teacher training; legal (incorporating forensic linguistics); and clinical (such as speech and language therapy).

In your first year you are introduced to the core skills you need for the degree: an introduction to ways of reading prose, poetry, and drama, as well as key concepts in linguistics and phonetics. In your second and third years, you build on these core skills while also choosing from a range of optional units that will really capture your imagination.

Why choose this course?

  • Develop your subject knowledge as well as your skills in analysis critical thinking and communication, creating a portfolio of work and a skill-set that will help you begin your graduate career
  • Benefit from being taught by enthusiastic highly experienced subject specialists who are nationally recognised for their research at a University with roots in teacher training going back to 1882
  • You have the option to study for the TEFLi, an important qualification should you wish to teach English in language schools across the UK and worldwide
  • Employability skills are embedded throughout the course and in your third year you take a work experience unit which allows you to develop as a professional in your preferred field
  • Learn research methods in your second year which will prepare you for your dissertation in the third year

with Professional Practice Year

This course has the option to be taken over four years which includes a year placement in industry. Undertaking a year in industry has many benefits. You gain practical experience and build your CV, as well as being a great opportunity to sample a profession and network with potential future employers.

There is no tuition fee for the placement year enabling you to gain an extra year of experience for free.

*Only available to UK/EU students.

with Foundation Year

A Degree with a Foundation Year gives you guaranteed entry to an Undergraduate course.

Whether you’re returning to learning and require additional help and support to up-skill, or if you didn’t quite meet the grades to pursue an Undergraduate course, our Degrees with Foundation Year provide a fantastic entry route for you to work towards a degree level qualification.

With our guidance and support you’ll get up to speed within one year, and will be ready to seamlessly progress on to undergraduate study at Bedfordshire.

The Foundation Year provides an opportunity to build up your academic writing skills and numeracy, and will also cover a range of subject specific content to fully prepare you for entry to an Undergraduate degree.

This is an integrated four-year degree, with the foundation year as a key part of the course. You will need to successfully complete the Foundation Year to progress on to the first year of your bachelor’s degree.

Why study a degree with a Foundation Year?

  • Broad-based yet enough depth to give you credible vocational skills
  • Coverage of a variety of areas typically delivered by an expert in this area
  • Gain an understanding of a subject before choosing which route you wish to specialise in
  • Great introduction to further study, and guaranteed progression on to one of our Undergraduate degrees

The degrees offering a Foundation Year provide excellent preparation for your future studies.

During your Foundation Year you will get the opportunity to talk to tutors about your degree study and future career aspirations, and receive guidance on the most appropriate Undergraduate course to help you achieve this; providing you meet the entry requirements and pass the Foundation Year.

 

Course Leader - Dr Nicola Darwood

I graduated with a PhD in English Literature in 2007, and I've been working at the University of Bedfordshire since 2009, teaching across all years of undergraduate study and supervising research degrees. I teach on a range of units, introducing students to literary theory, poetry, prose and plays from the medieval period to the twenty-first century, through to more specialist units such as Modern Irish Literature. I'm the course coordinator for the undergraduate English provision, and really enjoy working with students as they make their transition into higher education, helping them to achieve their full potential during their time at the university.

My own field of research focuses on women writers of the twentieth century and the literature of Bedfordshire, and I've published work on Elizabeth Bowen, Stella Benson and Nancy Spain. I'm also the co-editor for a journal dedicated to the work of Elizabeth Bowen. I'm currently working on an edited collection of essays on women writers of the interwar period, and the University's Literary Bedfordshire project which brings to life writers who have lived or worked in Bedfordshire.

I also enjoy working with our local secondary schools as part of the University's outreach programme, helping to enthuse students and encourage engagement with literature and language.

Course Leader - Dr Nicola Darwood

I graduated with a PhD in English Literature in 2007, and I've been working at the University of Bedfordshire since 2009, teaching across all years of undergraduate study and supervising research degrees. I teach on a range of units, introducing students to literary theory, poetry, prose and plays from the medieval period to the twenty-first century, through to more specialist units such as Modern Irish Literature. I'm the course coordinator for the undergraduate English provision, and really enjoy working with students as they make their transition into higher education, helping them to achieve their full potential during their time at the university.

My own field of research focuses on women writers of the twentieth century and the literature of Bedfordshire, and I've published work on Elizabeth Bowen, Stella Benson and Nancy Spain. I'm also the co-editor for a journal dedicated to the work of Elizabeth Bowen. I'm currently working on an edited collection of essays on women writers of the interwar period, and the University's Literary Bedfordshire project which brings to life writers who have lived or worked in Bedfordshire.

I also enjoy working with our local secondary schools as part of the University's outreach programme, helping to enthuse students and encourage engagement with literature and language.

What will you study?


Approaching Literature

How do we read texts and which approaches can we use to develop our understanding of texts? 

Focusing on close reading of selected texts and introducing students to a range of literary genres, including poetry, drama and fiction, students will be introduced to a range of theoretical approaches which will provide a good foundation for study at levels 5 and 6.

How Talk Works

Talk plays a pivotal role in every person's daily life and affects us in countless ways, whether we are in social, professional, academic and personal contexts. Yet, the rules of conversation are seldom even mentioned, let alone the focus of study. Ironically, how we interact with others significantly affects outcomes.   

This unit therefore looks at conversation as a phenomenon, its structure, patterns, and norms, and how all of these can vary from speaker to speaker, and also from situation to situation.  

Speech can be studied easily thanks to technology: digital audio, video and online recordings of speakers and speech events provide insights that have to be reconciled with assumptions and beliefs about language use. 

The observational and descriptive skills associated with the study of talk foster an evidence-based approach to conversation analysis, and this increases our sensitivity to cultural norms and expectations, all of which will be relevant to a range of situations far beyond the classroom.

Describing Language

English speakers know how to pronounce words, when to use them and how to put them together to make sentences. Yet, people seldom ‘lift the bonnet’ to see exactly how meaning is conveyed through putting together these units of language.

This unit introduces you to the machinery of English (its grammar) and considers the individual parts (the sounds) and how they combine to make words and sentences we can understand.  With a limited number of elements we can express an infinite number of ideas. Any new concept, original idea or innovation necessarily forces our grammatical machinery into action if others are to understand our creative discovery.   

Such concepts are relevant to any teacher, writer, detective or language analyst.  Indeed any ‘manipulator’ of English, in a wide range of careers will find this knowledge relevant, especially where the ability to recognise, understand and describe the subtleties of English are prized. 

This unit therefore lies at the core of your degree and furnishes you with an overall understanding of how words are formed, the basic grammatical concepts needed for a description of English, and its pronunciation. 

In this unit we aim to: 

  • Introduce you to the main structures of the English language
  • Equip you with the terminology and concepts to describe grammar, and lexis
  • Develop your familiarity with the anatomy of the vocal tract, how sounds are produced, and the rules that constrain them
  • help you transcribe and analyse texts in terms of the sounds and words of English.

How Texts Work

The written word is all around us, on paper, online and in text messages.  All texts are produced in context, with a particular purpose and, usually, for a given audience, all of which influences the structure and content - factors that were first recognised in classical times, but are as pertinent in the 21st C as they were for Aristotle.  

The primary aim of the unit is to explore the different ways in which written texts are constructed and achieve their purposes and meanings.  Over the course of the unit, theoretical perspectives will be outlined and then directly applied to practical analyses of a range of texts. The insights developed into how texts work will prove to be an asset in any future career where the production and interpretation of written language is of importance.

Introduction To Linguistics And Phonetics

Linguistics is mysterious to most people (who often think it involves speaking several languages).  Phonetics isn’t much better, and usually confused with phonics. Therefore, this unit provides an accessible overview of phonetics, a scientific account of human speech production, and linguistics, the scientific study of language - a field that belongs more to the sciences than the arts.   

As one of the ‘mind sciences’ linguistics has much in common with fields like philosophy, psychology, anthropology and cognition, but our emphasis is on our knowledge of language, how it works and how to study it. 

Themes covered in this unit will be useful to anyone who has an interest in language and communication and explores concepts used to describe how language works.  

The concepts we discuss underpin most of the other unit on  your degree.  They also have relevance to a wide range of careers where the ability to describe and analyse human communication is always valued. Accordingly, we aim to  

  • provide an overview of phonetics and linguistics and its sub disciplines
  • develop awareness of, and an interest in the study of speech and language with descriptive objectivity
  • explore the anatomy of the vocal tract and how speech is produced
  • establish principles of descriptivism, the basis for other units on the course 

Investigating The Social World

This unit aims to equip students with an understanding of different quantitative and qualitative approaches to investigating the social world and, professional settings in particular. More specifically, the unit will seek to:

  • Develop your understanding of both quantitative and qualitative research methods and the ways in which research data can be collected, analysed and reported.
  • Promote your understanding of the ethical issues involved in undertaking research in professional settings and on sensitive issues.
  • Develop your skills in designing and implementing all aspects of a research project.
  • Equip you with the knowledge and skills you need to undertake your dissertation at Level 6 where you may use both qualitative and quantitative methods

Creative Writing

This unit introduces you to the field of creative writing, particularly the two genres of short story and poetry. Its governing rationale is that writing is a process that can be broken down into three phases: Gathering, Shaping and Finishing. 

Obviously, you will write, and rewrite, a lot. Most of the writing will be on your own, outside the classroom. But some of it will be with others, in small group workshops. And in workshops, we share what we write. We play nice and we share.

Discourse And Ideology

  • To introduce you to a variety of approaches to conversation analysis.
  • To get you to apply conversation analysis techniques to the analysis of power asymmetries in everyday conversation and/or institutional talk.
  • To introduce you to key concepts in critical language study.
  • To get you to apply insights from critical language study to controversies in contemporary society over the relationship between discourse and power.
  • To consolidate your knowledge of university-level research, including library and Internet searches and the use of English Studies and Linguistics’ databases.
  • To provide you with opportunities to research and write essays on areas covered in the unit, with the help of one-to-one tutorial support.

Romantic Literature

This unit builds on the brief introduction to this period you encountered at Level 4 in ‘Literature and History’ and on the understanding of genres and theory you encountered at Level 4 in ‘Practising Ideas’. You will study a range of Romantic texts including poetry, novels, and criticism. You will think about how the production and consumption of various types of literature contributed to ideas about the self and society during this period, particularly in terms of religion, science, gender, and the Arts.

Victorian Literature

This unit builds on the brief introduction to this period you encountered at Level 4 in ‘Literature and History’, on the understanding of genres and theory you encountered at Level 4 in ‘Practising Ideas’, and on the work explored in the Level 5 unit, ‘Romantic Literature’. You will study a range of Victorian texts including novels, novellas, short stories, poetry and journalism. You will think about how the production and consumption of various types of literature contributed to ideas about the self and society, particularly in terms of religion, science, gender, and the Arts.

The Play's The Thing

  • To provide you with considerable practice in reading plays within their historical context
  • To provide you with an understanding of the philosophical, cultural and political conditions in which these plays were produced
  • To build your knowledge of plays and playwrights
  • To build your understanding of university level research
  • To build your communication skills

Style And Stylistics

This unit introduces you to the key concepts of literary stylistics as well as to central theories of literary style. Stylistics is often seen as a 'bridging' field of research between linguistics and literary criticism, enabling the mutual enrichment of each discreet subject area. Guided by key textbooks in the area of stylistics, we will examine the particular linguistic practices of poems, plays and prose as well as reflect on how a detailed knowledge of the way language works in literary form can enhance and deepen our understanding and enjoyment of literature. Alongside these sessions, we will also critically reflect on the nature of 'style' and on 'literariness' examining questions such as: what constitutes literary style? How do we describe it? Can style be imitated? How does style relate to 'tone' and 'feel' of a text?

Language Teaching, Learning And Assessment

This unit aims at applying certain second language learning theoretical principles into the practice of TESOL and ELT. It first examines current theories and research findings relating to second language learning research and then provides the opportunity to explore possible applications of such research to the practice of teaching and learning in context. This will help you to get an insight into research in the field of Second
Language learning and gain a level of expertise which will enhance your job prospects.

This unit aims to enable you to:

investigate certain factors that can affect second language learning;

collect and analyse inter-language data;

raise your awareness and critical understanding of issues involved in second language learning and language teaching;

promote a more principled, research-based approach to language teaching and learning.

This unit is a core element of the course for those looking to gain a TEFLi status and it is directly relevant to the content, aims and objectives of this course.

English Sentence Structure

The sentence is a fundamental unit of language whose internal structure is a combination of words whose behaviour and characteristics are measurable and predictable. Grammatical terms and concepts have always been at the fore in ELT but less so in mainstream English classrooms, until now.  Today, primary and secondary teachers need to understand the principles that determine word forms, word classes and how nouns and verbs combine to produce different types of sentence.  

Accordingly, this unit provides a solid grounding in the structure of words and sentences: key elements of English grammar, all of which underpins your entire English degree.  

Topics we discuss will be central to all writers, teachers, students and analysts, and relevant to a broad range of careers where the ability to recognise, describe and analyse the structure of English. 

In this unit we aim to: 

  • Build on grammatical knowledge from first year units
  • Develop your familiarity with the concepts and terminology used to describe grammar
  • Provide experience in analysis and highlight its potential
  • Establish the relationship between cognition and grammar
  • Develop your descriptive and communication skills which  readily transfer to other units and professions.

The Sounds Of English

How speech is organised, realised and chunked in everyday language is fundamental to any study of language.  The underlying principles, mechanics and rhythms of spoken English and how these vary affords an area of expertise that is uncommon, and yet central to classrooms, clinics and courtrooms, to say nothing of the stage.  This is because accents and pronunciation provide subtle clues to a speaker’s sense of identity, background, and state of mind.  

This is not just directly relevant to speech and language therapists, English teachers and sociologists, it also appeals to actors, artists and poets.  The scrutiny of spoken English involves  abilities to recognise, understand and analyse the patterns of spoken English, as much as the motives that underlie them.

Building on your knowledge of pronunciation from the first year, this unit aims to:

  • Develop your understanding of underlying phonological concepts
  • Explore how speech varies and is represented in transcription 
  • Establish objective facts surrounding accent variation and the relationship between phonology and grammar
  • Develop your descriptive objectivity and analytical skills which can be readily transferred to other units as well as professional contexts.
  • Provide experience of intonation analysis and highlight its significance

The Meaning Of Meaning

The significance of knowing how meaning is conveyed cannot be overstated: all humans focus on meaning in any wakeful situation, and more.  Semantics is the study of how meaning is stored in sounds and words, and pragmatics considers how we actually use language to communicate in everyday contexts in order to convey and interpret meaning.   

This unit provides an overview of the study of linguistic meaning (semantic and pragmatic) and aims to explore, from a cognitive perspective, the nature of language interpretation in the light of current theories. 

Such matters underpin any act of reading writing, speaking and listening regardless of social, domestic or professional situation.

Dissertation

To plan, carry out and write up an independent research project with guidance from a dissertation supervisor. This will involve you in identifying a topic that is of interest to you, relevant to your course and is important in the context of wider research and policy and practice debates. Undertaking individual research offers the opportunity to develop a variety of skills in planning and managing a project, including ethical issues and working with participants, gathering, analysing and reporting data.

Children's And Young Adult Fiction

  • To provide you with considerable practice in reading fictions for children in their historical and cultural contexts.
  • To introduce you to theoretical approaches relevant to the study of children’s fiction.
  • To familiarise you with a range of fictional genres written/produced for children, including contemporary film adaptations of traditional fairy tales, classic works of fantasy fiction, works of popular fiction, war fiction, and a range of contemporary ‘issues’ novels written for young adults.
  • To consolidate your knowledge of some of the major writers/producers of fictions for children, including Disney, C.S. Lewis, Blyton, Dahl, Serraillier, Anne Fine and Benjamin Zephaniah, amongst others.
  • To build upon your existing understanding of university-level literary research, including library and Internet searches and the use of English Studies and Children’s Literature databases.
  • To provide you with opportunities to research and write an essay and phase test on fictions for children.

Tesol Teaching Practice

This unit provides the opportunity to apply current theoretical issues in language teaching methodology to the practice of language teaching. It is designed to meet the needs of students who are planning a career in English language teaching in the UK and abroad. 

This unit aims to enable you to:

  • develop your awareness of various current issues in language teaching and learning
  • experience different teaching techniques and tasks, design and deliver your own lessons and materials
  • increase your knowledge and critical awareness of different language teaching and learning contexts.
  • This unit is a core element for those seeking to gain a TEFLi status and it is directly relevant to the content, aims and objectives of this course.

World Literature: Crossing Borders

A literary text becomes part of world literature when it leaves the space of its original culture and enters the space of another culture, a space that is often defined by that culture’s national tradition and the needs and the values of its own readers and writers. In this unit, we will look at the ways in which we read literary texts from other cultures, as well as the ways in which those cultures read their own texts.

We will attempt to read these texts with what David Damrosch calls ‘detached engagement’, putting them in the contexts of their original cultures both to decrease and to increase the distance between us and them, to make the texts simultaneously less strange and more strange, suggesting both less difference and more difference between cultures. In other words, we will supply just enough context so that we can hear the text speak to us, but hear it speak to its original audience, too. 

We will read texts written with both of these audiences very much in mind by writers who are interested in the process and the pace of globalisation and who often see themselves as members of a global community.

Forensic Linguistics

Your specialist knowledge of how language works and is used in given contexts and situations provides useful insights into an individual's background, role, understanding, and emotional state.  We know how cultural and societal conventions influence an individual’s patterns of speech and writing, and your awareness of such influences will inform any investigation where language samples are available.

This unit aims to explore ways in which understanding of language systems and patterns can constitute linguistic evidence that may be used in legal and investigative scenarios. This will hone your critical, analytical and evaluative skills and develop your burgeoning linguistic expertise.

Exploiting the entire content of your degree so far, we will see how critical thinking, systematicity and linguistics can solve problems associated with language evidence.

Professional Workplace

This unit helps you understand the role of a chosen graduate professional in their workplace, what their role entails, how they develop professional relationships and/or work with different agencies, and what barriers they may have faced in their career. 

This unit will help you reflect on your own personal development as a professional.

Language, Literacy And Cognition

‘Educated’ society is prefaced on highly-developed literary skills. From rudimentary scratches on clay tablets to digital text messaging, the written word has had a profound effect on culture, society and cognition for millennia.
This unit provides an overview of the nature of literacy by introducing a range of issues and perspectives: historical, sociological, linguistic, psychological/cognitive and educational. The aim is to complement the standard emphasis within linguistics on spoken language and relates the unit content to the contemporary discussion of the role of literacy in society.

Psycholinguistics - Language And The Brain

If eyes are said to be windows of the soul, then language must be a window to the mind.  Language is an intricate network of mental representations, of concepts, sounds and words, represented electrochemically in the brain. Our knowledge of language is as much a psycho-biological phenomenon as it is a sociocultural one. 

This unit explores current theories of how language develops and how it is realised in the human mind and by the human brain.

Individuals In Society (Education)

This is the first of two subject studies units that enables you to develop your underpinning knowledge and understanding for the courses that you will be studying when you enter your degree.


You will be studying aspects of sociology and thinking about how the underpinning theory relates firstly to you and the society in which you live and then to the subject area that you will be focussing on during your degree. The starting point will be you as an individual and relating your personal experiences, values and beliefs to sociological theory.

This serves the combined purposes of developing knowledge and understanding that will form a foundation for your degree studies; developing the ability to apply theory to real world examples and becoming familiar with some of the issues, skills and techniques that you will meet in your degree studies.
For this unit you will study a common core relating to sociology in a broader context and then apply that to sport and education or business as appropriate. You will complete work throughout the units which you have the flexibility to tailor to your subject interests

Throughout the course, you are encouraged to make links between units, and to apply, where appropriate, what you have learnt in one unit to the tasks and discussions set in others. In particular, you are encouraged to apply what you learn in this and the other subject-specific unit to the general studies units.

Contemporary Society In A Global World (Education)

This is the second subject studies unit that builds on the knowledge and understanding that you gained in semester one in relation to sociology and social structures and broadens the perspective to the subjects of diversity, inequality, health and well-being. As with your semester 1 unit, you will gain knowledge and understanding of the core subject and related theory and then apply that to a range of topics, issues and examples from your chosen subject area.
In semester 1 the focus was mainly on local and national contexts, this unit broadens the perspective to look at the broader, global context.

 

 

Examining Research (Education)

This unit applies subject knowledge and critical thinking that you have developed through your other units of the Foundation Year and gives you the experience opportunity to think about how:

  • information about education and sport is developed through research;
  • how different people in your subject area may use a diverse range of methodologies and methods to go about the research process.

You will examine some research that has been done in relation to a subject that you will be studying on your degree. This is your chance to unpick what the researchers have done and assess its strengths and weaknesses

As this is an introduction before you get the opportunity to study research design and methods in more depth, the aim is to give you the opportunity to look at a variety of examples and to develop an informed understanding of different approaches. There are also opportunities to examine and evaluate how many people encounter ‘information and knowledge’ though non-academic sources such as the media and the internet.

Studying For He (Education)

In this unit you will be introduced to what academic study in Higher Education is all about, both generally and related to studying specific subjects. You will be given opportunities to develop the skills, attitudes, confidence and strategies to help you succeed in the course and thus to meet the entry requirements for university study.
You will be supported in identifying where you have scope to develop skills and abilities and in planning for your on-going personal development and what works best for you. The module has a series of short core and option blocks of learning activity and tutors will guide you towards the options best suited for the subject area you are hoping to study in your degree and your own experience.
As you go through the year you will notice that you will be able to link the learning that you do in this module with other parts of the course and apply the learning to the assessments you will be doing.

Modernist Literary Practices

This unit examines a broad selection of literature, theory and aspects of popular culture from the late nineteenth century to first half of the twentieth century. In particular, we examine pioneering works that are considered exemplary of literary ‘modernism’. As part of your developing knowledge of this period of modernity, we will consider the conflicting, often contradictory and varying versions of literary modernism and examine these alongside broader social, cultural and political developments.

How will you be assessed?


The course takes an incremental and varied approach to the assessment of the course content culminating in the Dissertation (a substantial piece of original research whose precise focus is determined by each student according to their anticipated career plans). Here the ability to plan execute and evaluate linguistic data and/or literary sources (both primary and secondary sources) is assessed and represents the apex of a student's undergraduate studies.

Other assignments include essays oral presentations close readings reviews research proposals a range of phase tests and seen and unseen exams. As you progress from Level 4 to Level 5 to Level 6 it is expected your response to assessment tasks will become more sophisticated as your skills and subject knowledge develop. The level of study is reflected in the level of response required by assessment criteria.

Careers


Upon graduation, possible career pathways include teaching English as a second language; teaching in a primary or secondary school setting; speech and language therapy; forensic linguistics; research; public relations; librarianship; arts administration; journalism; and publishing. (Some careers require further qualifications)

You can also progress to our Master’s Applied Linguistics (TESOL) or Master’s by Research, expanding your career opportunities, or enabling you to study for a doctorate.

Entry Requirements

104 UCAS tariff points including 80 from at least 3 A-levels or equivalent

Entry Requirements

48 UCAS tariff points including 32 from at least 1 A-level or equivalent

Fees for this course

UK 2024/25

The full-time standard undergraduate tuition fee for the Academic Year 2024/25 is £9,250 per year. You can apply for a loan from the Government to help pay for your tuition fees. You can also apply for a maintenance loan from the Government to help cover your living costs. See www.gov.uk/student-finance

Merit Scholarship

We offer a Merit Scholarship to UK students, worth £2,400* over three academic years, which is awarded to those who can demonstrate a high level of academic achievement, through scoring 120 UCAS tariff points or more.

Bedfordshire Bursary

If you aren’t eligible for the Merit Scholarship, this Bursary is there to help UK students with aspects of student living such as course costs. The Bursary will give you £1,000* over three academic years, or £1,300* if you are taking your course over four academic years (including those with a Foundation Year).

Full terms and conditions can be found here.

Alternatively if you have any questions around fees and funding please email admission@beds.ac.uk

International

The full-time standard undergraduate tuition fee for the academic year 2024/25 is £15,500 per year.

There are range of Scholarships available to help support you through your studies with us.

A full list of scholarships can be found here.

Alternatively if you have any questions around fees and funding, please email admission@beds.ac.uk

Fees for this course

UK 2024/25

The full-time standard undergraduate tuition fee for the Academic Year 2024/25 is £9,250 per year. You can apply for a loan from the Government to help pay for your tuition fees. You can also apply for a maintenance loan from the Government to help cover your living costs. See www.gov.uk/student-finance

Merit Scholarship

We offer a Merit Scholarship to UK students, worth £2,400* over three academic years, which is awarded to those who can demonstrate a high level of academic achievement, through scoring 120 UCAS tariff points or more.

Bedfordshire Bursary

If you aren’t eligible for the Merit Scholarship, this Bursary is there to help UK students with aspects of student living such as course costs. The Bursary will give you £1,000* over three academic years, or £1,300* if you are taking your course over four academic years (including those with a Foundation Year).

Full terms and conditions can be found here.

Alternatively if you have any questions around fees and funding please email admission@beds.ac.uk

International

The full-time standard undergraduate tuition fee for the academic year 2024/25 is £15,500 per year.

There are range of Scholarships available to help support you through your studies with us.

A full list of scholarships can be found here.

Alternatively if you have any questions around fees and funding, please email admission@beds.ac.uk

Virtual Tour

Unistats